K26253 Interruptions #2
K26253 Interruptions #2
Photography ed.1/5
21 1/4 x 16 3/4 in
2005
K26254 Interruptions #3
K26254 Interruptions #3
Photography ed.1/5
21 1/4 x 16 3/4 in
2012
K26259 Interruptions #13
K26259 Interruptions #13
Photography ed.1/5
21 1/4 x 16 3/4 in
2003
K23525 In camera #57
K23525 In camera #57
Photography ed.1/5
39 x 49 in
2003
K23524 In camera #60
K23524 In camera #60
Photography ed.1/5
39 x 49 in
2003

Luis Mallo

For five years I worked on a series entitled In Camera, 2001-2005, the urban landscapes depicted in these large-scale photographs were partially obstructed by foreground objects such as walls or fences. These barriers acted like veils that draped, separated, distorted, and most importantly concealed the scenes behind them. The barriers, however, were never completely opaque or impenetrable. The viewer could peak into and look beyond the holes, gaps, tears, and openings in the foreground and imagine or fill in the entire landscape. The places I’ve chosen to document for the series Open Secrets, 2006-2010, are concealed or out of bounds to some extend (at least to the general public), but most significantly, they are used to contain and preserve valuable objects. Some of these sites for example, include storage areas from major art museums. I have for some time been interested in photographing these ‘hidden’ spaces as a way to reveal some aspect of their functionality, but in fact, what draws me to these environments is really their inaccessibility, their mystery. They characterize a disciplinary and rigorous formality, which I find visually arresting, yet at the same time they feel intimate and familiar. In addition, there’s also the general significance: they represent the need to protect and preserve our rich artistic history as well as our own cultural identity imbedded in these. The series has been shown at the Jersey City Museum in their Projects Room in 2009. It was exhibited at Praxis Art gallery in New York City in the fall of 2009 and in Sicardi gallery in Houston as part of the FotoFest biennial in 2010. The series has been reviewed in Art Nexus and Art in America.

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